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Distributed Ledger Technology will take off when developers have good tools.
DLT Tools are coming soon!
We are now in the process of building out "DLT Tools"; the initial tool will be a web based designer for creating customized distributed ledgers.
Distributed Ledger Technology will take off when developers have good tools.
How will it all work?  Let's look at a conceptual demo:  Click Here
In all the hype about distributed ledgers, have you ever wondered what a distributed ledger looks like?  For one of the current leading "flavors of the month", Hyperledger Fabric, "A distributed ledger is a multi-party database with no central trusted authority."[ref]
For Hyperledger Fabric, every participant in the permissioned blockchain is responsible for maintaining their own version of the distributed ledger, usually in some type of local database structure.
In all the hype about distributed ledgers, have you ever wondered how a distributed ledger is validated?  For the current distributed ledger platforms, especially the ones that implement a multi-party database, there is some type of parliamentary voting process to establish a consensus. The following "Example scenario" is from the Hyperledger documentation:
  1. Everyone in a room has a book with the instructions to write down entries as they get called out.
  2. Someone calls out item number one and everyone writes it down.
  3. Then two people call out item number two at the same time, but the item number differs.
  4. There needs to be a process [truly byzantine] for who wins, and the loser gets to try to call out item number three.
  5. When all agree on the outcome of an entry, the next link in that ledger can be written.
  6. Whether this happens in a small scale or the size of the internet, that is the spectrum for how a distributed ledger can work.
The parliamentary voting process used by most of the current distributed ledger platforms is convoluted (truly byzantine) and unnecessary.  When members of a permissioned distributed ledger application have trusted digital credentials, their entries into the distributed ledger can be trusted.  The order of the entries will be determined by established rules of process management.
How will it all work?  Let's look at a conceptual demo:  Click Here
© Copyright 2018 ~ Trust Nexus, Inc.
All technologies described here in are "Patent Pending".